Science

Inside Gab: The people first, pro-free speech social network

Looking for a social media platform where you will not be censored for exercising your right to free speech? Look no further, because it’s arrived!

(INTELLIHUB) — Meet Gab. It’s the latest kid on the social media block which is rapidly shaping up to be a formidable alternative to the dying social networking platforms that are Facebook and Twitter.

As someone who has been test-driving the new platform for over a month now, I’m both delighted and excited to give you my personal, honest review of this fantastic new social network.

Gab was founded by Silicon Valley based entrepreneur and pro-Trump supporter, Andrew Torba back in August this year. It’s currently in private beta stage, so you’ll be put on a waiting list and will have to wait to receive your invitation – don’t worry it doesn’t take too long (at least mine didn’t).

Gab’s hashtag #SpeakFreely pretty much epitomizes the company’s ethos.
“At Gab, we believe that free speech and free thought are under attack. Political correctness has risen up at the expense of freedom of speech and has become a cancer on discourse and culture. We think that people shouldn’t treat unpleasant, counter-cultural, or conflicting ideas, words, or behaviors as full-scale criminal offenses,” the 25-year-old CEO of Gab said.

In recent days, many mainstream news outlets have sought to smear Gab’s reputation by falsely calling it “the alt-right’s very own Twitter (alt-right is practically a synonym for white supremacists and neo-Nazis).”

“Everybody is welcome on Gab and always will be” stated Mr. Torba.

“We’re not going to censor you for having a different opinion … or for arbitrary reasons.”

“We promote raw, rational, open, and authentic discourse online,”

He said he wants everyone to feel safe on Gab but said the management would not police what is hate speech and what isn’t.

Gab believes in empowering users to self-censor and remove unwanted followers, words, phrases, and topics they don’t want to see in their feeds. They strongly believe that “self-censorship is the only true form of individual liberty and free speech online in an era of corporate-sponsored, politically manipulated, and ever-changing algorithms that are driving our social feeds.”

And yes, due to the platform being devoid of censorship, this might just not be the ‘safest space’ for intolerant hateful liberals who easily get triggered by dissenting opinions.

But of course if you’re a liberal, you’re still welcome. That’s the beauty of Gab.

What’s with the funny name ‘Gab’?

Yes, the term ‘gab’ is found in the dictionary. It’s an informal verb that means ‘talk, typically at length, about trivial matters.’

Now of course whether you talk about trivial matters or serious ones on Gab is totally up to you. Again, you can be assured that Gab will not censor you over an anti-Islamic rant, for example.

Obviously illegal content such as pornography, threats of violence and releasing personal information without the subject’s consent is forbidden and any such content will be dealt with swiftly.

What kind of people can I expect to find on Gab?

Like I mentioned before, this platform is definitely not dominated by the ‘alt-right’, neo-Nazis and white supremacists. There may be a few but they’re certainly not the majority. For the most part, you’ll find everyday, freedom-loving people who care about each other. There’s a growing number of notable people including those who have been on the receiving end of Twitter’s censorship crackdown who have made a mass exodus to Gab so be sure to follow them once you get your account setup.

What kind of features can I expect on Gab?

  • Users can post “Gabs,” which have a 300 character limit
  • Users can follow other Gabbers and be followed back
  • Users can upvote or downvote Gabs
  • Top Gabs are ranked based on these votes
  • Gabs are also displayed in a chronological home feed, something that is no longer a default option on other social channels
  • Hashtags can be used on Gab just like on Facebook and Twitter

In terms of the overall design, Gab has many of the same features as Twitter and Reddit as well as several that are uniquely Gab. Aesthetically wise, it sports a pretty clean and non-cluttered layout. Honestly if I was to compare this with Twitter, Gab is so much more user-friendly, simple and straightforward to use.

A lot of suggestions have been put forward by ‘Gabbers’ to expand and improve the features and with the way it’s going, I’m positive that this new platform will easily take over the dying Facebook and Twitter social media empires.

In recent months thanks to Twitter and Facebook’s blitz on dissenting opinions, hundreds of thousands of people – including notable figures – have left the mainstream social platforms in droves seeking alternatives like Gab.

Why not join the exodus? Sign up here for your Gab account and #SpeakFreely without Big Brother and algorithms being the arbitrator of what you post. You might have to wait to get your invitation but I can tell you right now, it’s definitely worth the wait. Thank me later!

Disclaimer: This is a totally independent, non-partisan review.

Caleb Stephen is a freelance journalist, independent commentator, political activist and the founder and Editor-In-Chief of The Caleb Report (Calebreport.com) He is also a contributing writer and editor of WeAreChange.org.
Caleb has written for and has articles published on world renowned websites such as World Net Daily, The Huffington Post, Intellihub, Natural News.com and Rense.com.
Visit his website calebstephen.com and follow him on twitter @CalebsOfficial.
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Featured Image: Japanexperterna.se/Flickr

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